Projects

2019 CUSUR CALENDAR
 
Upcoming Events 2019
US-UA Security Dialogue X
Washington, DC
February 28, 2019
 
UA HES Special Event:
Sobornist' at 100
Ukrainian Museum
May 4, 2019   
 
US-UA BNS Special Event
Washington DC
May 23, 2019
 
US-UA WG Yearly Summit VI
Washington, DC
June 13, 2019

US-UA Energy Dialogue VI
Kyiv, Ukraine
August 29, 2019 
 
UA HES Special Event:
UA-AM Community at 125
Princeton Club/NY
September 21, 2019 
 
UA QUEST RT XX
Washington, DC
October 10, 2019
 
UA HES Forum VII:
LT-PL-UA Relations
Chicago
November 9, 2019   
 

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CUSUR 2016 - Project I
US-UA “Working Group” Initiative

The US-Ukraine “Working Group” Initiative was launched in 2007 in order to secure an array of experts in "areas of interest” for CUSUR and its various forums/proceedings; at the same time, it was hoped that the ‘experts’ might agree to write a series of ‘occasional papers’ to identify “major issues” impacting on US-Ukrainian relations.
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CUSUR 2017 - Project II
Publication Efforts

Recognizing the urgent need to set up proper channels for the maximum circulation of the information/analysis CUSUR possessed or had at its disposal, the Center long focused on having ‘a publication presence’ of some form or another.
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CUSUR 2018 - Project III
DC Occasional Briefings Series

CUSUR did not turn its attention to having a DC presence until summer 2012. Borrowing space when the need arose (particularly for various forum steering committees meetings) from the American Foreign Policy Council, its longest abiding partner, seemed to suffice; an Acela ride from the Center’s NY office did the rest. If there was a concern, it was to open an office in Kyiv.
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Black Sea Synergy: Approaches for a deeper cooperation
Source: Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung

Ukraine's Euro-Atlantic Future: International Forum Series

Black Sea Synergy Forum

Black Sea Synergy: Approaches for a deeper cooperation

André Drewelowsky / Nico Lange

Compilation of the speakers’ statements: André Drewelowsky, Maik Matthes, Yuliya Shelkovnikova

ImageThe Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung Ukraine organized the international conference “Black Sea Synergy” on October 21-23 in cooperation with the Polish-Ukrainian Cooperation Foundation (PAUCI), the Odessa City Council and the Center for US-Ukrainian Relations (CUSUR). On a ferry boat, going from Odessa (Ukraine) to Istanbul (Turkey), 100 conference guests from Ukraine and eight other countries discussed about the new Black Sea Synergy Concept of the European Commission (launched in April 2007) and tried to take a stock of the previous and possible future measures of cooperation of the Black Sea states. The event was supported by the International Renaissance Foundation, the German Robert Bosch Stiftung and the Delegation of the European Commission to Ukraine. Please find here a résumé and a compilation of the speakers' statements.

One of the primary aims of this event was to bring together experts and key decision-makers from the Black Sea countries as well as from the European Union, in order to discuss possible future joint projects promoting Black Sea cooperation.

The conference explored the opportunities and challenges of cooperation in the Black Sea following the accession of Romania and Bulgaria to the European Union and ways of supporting Turkey’s drive for EU accession. For the first time a group of experts accompanied by representatives of NGOs and local politicians from Ukraine made such a journey in search of synergies bringing Ukraine into the wider regional framework.

Trying to resume the outcomes of the conference there should be pointed out: The participants agreed that the Black Sea region plays a more and more important role in European and world policy. But many “frozen conflicts” slow down the development of the region. These conflicts should be resolved by negotiations, including all local as well as external actors.

A great field of interest is – especially for the European Union – the energy sector. But not only: Economically the Black Sea region is substantially increasing its weight. The Black Sea Area with its 330 million people is already now a very big, constantly growing market. Furthermore issues like border conflicts, migration and environmental problems are very urgent and can only be tackled, if the Black Sea boarding countries have a common approach.

The majority of the participants demanded more activity of the European Union in the wider Black Sea area. A clear message to the European Union was formulated by James Sherr: The EU should answer the question, if it wishes to be seen in the Black Sea region in principle as a magnet or as a barrier. To some extent the EU must be a barrier – to illegal migration, to human trafficking, to organized crime in all its aspects. But unless the EU is plainly a magnet, it will not provide the inducements that will enable the Black Sea countries to strive for democratic standards and the rule of law.

There will be external pressures in the Black Sea region in future or even external shocks. The challenge for all actors is to ensure that, when they arise, the ties of cooperation and interest are strong enough to absorb them.

Fabrizio Tassinari expressed the idea (supported especially by Andriy Veselovskyy, Ukrainian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs) that the Black Sea countries could develop and move in different speed. One should not bind necessarily Black Sea Synergy and the countries of the region into one pack. If some countries are more qualified or active in some areas, they should not be forced to wait for the others, but they should be seen as “light houses” for the whole region.

Finally, it was stated that there is already a lot of intellectual effort and potential in Black Sea cooperation. The performance, presentation and coordination of the Black Sea countries, their think tanks and civil societies have to be improved – then Black Sea Synergy would have not just a future, but a measurable, concrete impact in developing regional cooperation in the Black Sea Area. Especially it was underlined, that it is very important to include Russia into the dialogue, as Russia is one of the big players in the Black Sea region. But also external actors like the USA, NATO and UN should be invited to the discussions.

 

Past Highlight Events

RT XVII Items of Note
Highlights from Ukraine's Quest for Mature Nation Statehood RT XVII: Ukraine & Religious Freedom, held in Washington, DC on Oct. 27, 2016
 
UA HES SE: UA 25th B-Day
Highlights from UA HES Special Event: 'Commemorating the 25th Anniversary of the Modern Ukrainian State', held at the NY Princeton Club on Sept. 17, 2016
 
US-UA WG YS IV Highlights
Highlights from US-UA WG Yearly Summit IV: Providing Ukraine with an Annual Report Card, held at the University Club in Washington, DC on June 16, 2016
 
US-UA SD VII Items of Note
Highlights from US-Ukraine Security Dialogue VII held on February 25, 2016 in Washington DC
 
UA HES SE: WW2 Legacy
Highlights from the UA Historical Encounters Special Event: 'Contested Ground': The Legacy of WW2 in Eastern Europe, held in Edmonton on October 23-24, 2015
 
Holodomor SE Highlights
Highlights from the UA Historical Encounters Special Event: Taking Measure of the Holodomor, held at the Princeton Club of NY on November 5-6, 2013
 
US-UA SD III Items of Note
Highlights from US-Ukraine Security Dialogue III held on May 19, 2012 in Chicago, IL

  • Former UA Foreign Minister Volodymyr Ohryzko's keynote
 
UEAF Forum VI Highlights
Highlights from UEAF Forum VI, held in Ottawa, Canada on March 7-8, 2012
 
RT XII Items of Note
Highlights from Ukraine's Quest for Mature Nation Statehood RT XII: PL-UA & TR-UA, held in Washington, DC on Oct 19–20, 2011
 
US-UA ED III Items of Note
Highlights from US-Ukraine Energy Dialogue III, held in Washington DC
on April 15-16, 2008
 
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